April 27th is World Tapir Day, a day set aside globally to celebrate tapirs and raise awareness about this endangered species, the threats they face, and how we can help.

The Central American tapir is the largest terrestrial mammal in the Neotropics and also one of the most ecologically important species. Known as “gardeners of the forest” because they disperse important seeds, tapirs are vital to forest ecosystems and thereby critical for reversing global climate change. Tapirs are largely threatened by habitat loss, poaching, road collisions, and conflict with farmers. There are fewer than 4,500 adults remaining in the wild today, and existent populations are declining globally.

Costa Rica Wildlife Foundation (CRWF), through its signature project Nai Conservation [ http://naiconservation.org], is leading tapir conservation in Costa Rica using cutting-edge research, educational outreach, and by partnering with local communities, businesses, and government to find lasting solutions for human-tapir coexistence.

And these efforts are working. Since 2005, tapir road collisions have decreased by 90%, conflict has been prevented on more than 5,000 hectares through responsible ecotourism partnerships with farmers, 400 schoolchildren have participated in Salva-Dantas (“Save Tapirs”) educational programs, and 153 camera-traps have been deployed by researchers and community-based brigades to monitor and study wild tapirs.

Beginning on Tapir Day 2020, CRWF is launching a month-long campaign to raise $5,000 for this important work. With the ongoing pandemic, this comes at a difficult time for the world. But conservation must continue, and CRWF is committed to leading the way for tapirs.

Your generous donation today can help CRWF provide:

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A printed wildlife field guide for local guides in tapir ecotourism
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An interpretative sign for farms participating in tapir ecotourism
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Meals & accommodation for one day of field work for a tapir researcher
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One kit (includes education materials, notebook, t-shirt) for a student in the Salva-Dantas program with local schools
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Classroom education materials to implement Salva-Dantas programs
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Electric fencing to protect 100m2 of cropland & mitigate tapir-farmer conflict
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A camera-trap station for collecting images of wild tapirs for conservation monitoring
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A tapir crossing sign to prevent vehicle collisions